granny records
Wings of Winds CD | granny17 cover

costis drygianakis

Wings of Winds CD | granny17

Release date: December 2016

Edition number: 200

Price: €10


 

Edition of  200 copies

Design and artwork by Opora

 

Mado Anastasiou : violin, Spyros Charmanis : guitar, Christos Chondropoulos : percussion, Eva Gallou : voice, Athanassios Gavardinas : voice, Zissis Georgalios : kanonaki, Christos Germenoglou : drums, Olya Gluschenko : voice, keyboards, recordings, Christos Kaltis : bass, voice, Orfeas Kappa : clarinet, Vladimir Katasonov : voice, Maria Katasonova : voice, Jason Lescalleet : electronics, Thanassis Mavrikos : zourna, Marina Mogli : voice, Dimitris Papadatos : electronics, Yannis Saxonis : synthesizer, Sery Seidou : recordings, Yiannis Seitos : guitar, Lambros Zafeiropoulos : electronics, recordings


The band Atavism: George Georgalas: drums, Stratos Pandazidis: bass, Manos Michaelides: guitar


The Group Monday’s Drop(s): Eirini Avgoustaki, Maria Leftherioti, Marina Koumoulentzou


and Costis Drygianakis


Plus some voices from the album: Starinnye Kabardinskie Narodnye Pesni (Old Style Folk Songs From Kabardina), Melodiya D-27507

 

The Group Monday’s Drop(s) was created in the University of Thessaly (Department of early Childhood Education) in the frame of P. Kanellopoulos’ project “The Scandal of Musical Democracy”


Costis Drygianakis


 

Born in Volos, Greece, in 1965. Studied Physics and Social Anthropology, involved with music, loves dogs, collects ceramics, cooks spaghetti. Active as a composer and record producer since 1987. According to an old press release, “the music of Costis Drygianakis, usually assembled with the help of recording media (tapes, computers etc) belongs to the genre of electroacoustic music, though generally avoiding the dogmatic approaches. Frequently using unorthodox relationships of composition, performance and re-composition, it utilizes and tames randomness and improvisation, balances in-between ambience and surprise, includes references but not identifications and, finally, explores without abandoning its sentimental space".

shipping dates for pre-orders are estimated and are subject to change

reviews

The Wire: Adventures In Modern Music

Costis Drygianakis Wings Of Winds Granny CD/DL The opening five minutes of Wings Of Winds revel in excess with a multi-layered blast of frenetic improvising. A host of guest musicians contributes to the raucous polyphony. Then, just as you start to feel this 50 minute ride is going to strain the nerves, the turbulence subsides and women’s voices converse while amplified strings ping and twang lackadaisically. Interference crackles quietly, and slight, ephemeral melodies take shape. Other voices, mostly indistinct, drift in and out. A violin sounds wispy and wistful. A kit drummer enters the frame. Electronics waver atmospherically. Scribbly vinyl scratching is pitched against meandering clarinet and drifting guitar chords. The assemblage continues to mutate. Beyond the superficial randomness Costis Drygianakis is firmly in control, directing an unpredictable course of events that makes a healthy range of demands on the attentiveness of his listeners.

 

We Need No Swords

The squall of bloops, rushing snares, clarinet hoots and John McCaughlin-style shredding  that erupts at the start of Costis Drygianakis’ Wings of Winds certainly suggests some vintage improv collective getting jiggy in fine style. But closer inspection reveals something more nuanced and mysterious, a long-form work of intuitive electroacoustic composition that deploys improvisation as one of a matrix of techniques as it moves carefully through its 40-or so minute runtime. In fact, that opening blast is deceptive, working perhaps as a palette cleanser rather than a statement of intent. There’s something similar positioned at the end, but what happens in between is radically different to those those two blowouts – a calmer, more considered set of sonic gestures. A rain of metallic plinks acts as a gentle backdrop to a recorded conversation. A simple violin figure is accompanied by only a soft crackle. An eerie cocoon of electronic whines is punctuated by jittery percussion. A conversation is barely audible.
Enigmatic, sure, but there is a sense of space and of purpose to Wings of Winds, with Drygianakis’s meticulous edits bringing together sections from around 20 individual musicians, plus two groups (a trio and quartet) and voices sampled from ethnographic recordings. Yet far from being the maximalist jam session that you might expect, the album makes use of that multitude almost counterintuitively, shaping its components into austere and meditative beauty. This is, undoubtably, Drygianakis’s show, despite the legion of contributors, and his ability to not be overwhelmed by his source material is credit to a compositional sense honed over a career working in tape and sample manipulation. Subtle, nuanced and powerful, Wings of Winds is nourishing listening for sure.

The squall of bloops, rushing snares, clarinet hoots and John McCaughlin-style shredding  that erupts at the start of Costis Drygianakis’ Wings of Winds certainly suggests some vintage improv collective getting jiggy in fine style. But closer inspection reveals something more nuanced and mysterious, a long-form work of intuitive electroacoustic composition that deploys improvisation as one of a matrix of techniques as it moves carefully through its 40-or so minute runtime. In fact, that opening blast is deceptive, working perhaps as a palette cleanser rather than a statement of intent. There’s something similar positioned at the end, but what happens in between is radically different to those those two blowouts – a calmer, more considered set of sonic gestures. A rain of metallic plinks acts as a gentle backdrop to a recorded conversation. A simple violin figure is accompanied by only a soft crackle. An eerie cocoon of electronic whines is punctuated by jittery percussion. A conversation is barely audible.
Enigmatic, sure, but there is a sense of space and of purpose to Wings of Winds, with Drygianakis’s meticulous edits bringing together sections from around 20 individual musicians, plus two groups (a trio and quartet) and voices sampled from ethnographic recordings. Yet far from being the maximalist jam session that you might expect, the album makes use of that multitude almost counterintuitively, shaping its components into austere and meditative beauty. This is, undoubtably, Drygianakis’s show, despite the legion of contributors, and his ability to not be overwhelmed by his source material is credit to a compositional sense honed over a career working in tape and sample manipulation. Subtle, nuanced and powerful, Wings of Winds is nourishing listening for sure.

 

VITAL WEEKLY

Here's another release by Costis Drygianakis (see also Vital Weekly 838, 910 and 978) and apparently he's now entering a new period, and yet again he has it performed by a whole bunch of people, playing violin, guitar, percussion, voice, bass, kanonaki, clarinet and electronics. The

only name I recognized was that of Jason Lescalleet, who provides electronics. I am not sure how Drygianakis works; perhaps he writes down his a score and has it performed or maybe just parts and has people improvise along guidelines. Previously his work seemed all about death, now it's 'Wings Of Winds', maybe a lighter theme? Music wise I don't think this new work sounds so much different than before. It is a work that spans a wide field of musical interests. Extended passages are very soft with just a bunch of small electronics, one instrument that goes along,

but there are a few passages that are loud and orchestral; these may have much more modern classical feel about it; or perhaps an improvised feeling. Those parts, for instance the opening minutes of this piece and again around the forty-minute break, are the ones I didn't particularly

like very much. When Drygianakis is about going more tape-manipulation, electro-acoustic, say from six to twenty-six minutes, where he builds tension pretty well, and works with a variety of sounds and dynamics, I am actually all ears and enjoy it quite a lot. This I thought was quite good

to very good. Throughout it means that I enjoyed most of this fifty-minute piece with the exception of some of bits and pieces here and there. However as a whole I think this is quite a fine combination of modern classical playing and electronics, and for once not playing together at the same time, but oddly enough next to each other, or so it seems. (FdW)


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